4-H Rodeo Safety: Roping and Timed Events

4-H Rodeo Safety: Roping and Timed Events


(melancholy music) – Hi guys, I’m coach
Corbett with the New Mexico State University rodeo team and I’d like to personally welcome
you to the New Mexico 4-H rodeo safety video. Now I know some of the information you’re about to listen to
and watch in this video seems very basic and common
knowledge, and some of it is. But I’d like to stress to you guys the importance of taking
care of the basics. We need to make sure that we
have good competitive equipment that our horses are taken care of, and that we’re taking care of ourselves. I hope that you guys enjoy this video and I’ll see you after. (upbeat drums) – We’re gonna be talking
about horse safety and procedures in keeping
them safe at the rodeos. You wanna make sure they’re
fed and watered on time, and on time I mean two
hours, hour and a half before the rodeo. You wanna make sure they’re warmed up. I always like to get on an
hour before the perf starts or the slack starts whenever I’m up and make sure they’re legged up, warmed up, ready to go, stretched out. An older horse, you really
wanna get out even earlier so that way, like an older person, they have these older
joints and they’ll swell up and you want them stretched
out and feeling good before the rodeo. Also, I like to put bell boots which go around the ankles of the horse, splint boots which go
around the tendons here, and with the tendons you always want them pulling to the inside or towards the tail, so that way you don’t
blow a tendon in that leg. – My rodeo tip would be
to always wear polo wraps or splint boots, if you
don’t have splint boots, you can use polo wraps,
but you have to make sure you wrap them correctly and very tight. – When your horse drinks
form the same trough as other horses, that’s
how diseases and sicknesses are transmitted from each horse. If a sick horse drinks from a trough and then your horse comes
in and drinks after, your horse has a
possibility of getting sick and/or catching whatever
the other horse has. So that’s why I personally
like to bring my own buckets and make sure they’re cleaned out, they’re sprayed out,
and the water is clean that my horses are drinking. I always like to think
of my horse as a tool. It’s like a tool, you
don’t wanna leave it out in the rain and in the sun. If you leave a tool in
the rain and the sun and then want to use it two weeks later, it’s gonna be rusted and you’re
not gonna be able to use it and a horse is the same thing. And it’s alive so you really
have to take care of it better. (dramatic music) No arena is ever the same. No dirt is ever the same at a rodeo. You always wanna make it a habit to go check the ground so that way you know what you’re gonna do and you know what your
horse is gonna have to do to be able to get through that ground. Whether it’s deep, whether it’s perfect, whether it’s hard, doesn’t matter. You always wanna get in the habit of going and checking the ground, so that way you know how
you’re supposed to perform and how your horse is gonna perform. (dramatic music) – I’d like to talk to you guys about the importance of being safe in a barrel racing and pole bending event. My first point to start off is your horse. It’s very important for your horse to be in the best shape he can be in and on a diet that fits him best. Being in shape means
being exercised daily, whether it may be going down a sandbank or loping or trotting in an arena. It’s important for them to be in shape so they can perform at the
best of their abilities. Second I’d like to mention the saddle. A saddle is very important
in being successful in the barrel racing
and pole bending event. In order to be successful
you need a saddle that will fit you but
will also fit your horse. It’s important that your
saddle fits your horse so he may be comfortable when performing and perform at the best he can. A saddle that fits will leave room here for his withers and will not pinch. A saddle that fits you
is also very important so it allows you to stay in your seat, and not get in his way of
running or doing his job. Along with saddles I’d
like to talk to you guys about your cinches being
tight, meaning your front cinch and if you have a back
cinch, it being tight. It’s important that
your saddle stays tight so it doesn’t slide or
roll on your horse’s back so he’s able to focus and perform. A way to check your saddle if
it’s tight or not tight enough your hand can go through here, you should be good, not too tight. If your saddle doesn’t move,
how it stays right here, it’s perfect. Lastly, I’d like to talk to you guys about boots on your horse. Boots are very important on a horse to keep their legs safe from any damage in tendons or bones or anything in there. Bell boots that go around the hoof are important for overreaching, so they won’t clip or pull a shoe. Splint boots are important on a horse to keep their front legs from damage in tendons or bones right in there, or anything important. Hind boots are important
for their hind legs, to keep their hocks and everything safe. That way when they turn around barrels they won’t burn or anything
on their back legs. (dramatic music) – I’d like to talk a little bit about just how to safely saddle our horse and just make sure everything is in good working condition for roping. One of the major parts
that you need to make sure you check every time you saddle your horse is make sure that your latigo straps are not worn or brittle, they’re
in good working condition. You can oil them up to
keep them lasting longer. When you cinch your horse up, it’s always important to make sure that you get at least maybe three wraps of your latigo around your cinch. That way if something does actually happen and your latigo breaks for some reason, there’s still something
to hold your saddle on. When we’re team roping you wanna make sure that your saddle is tight enough that when you rope and you dally, that your saddle’s not gonna fall off. If our saddle is too
loose, then that’s when we get in a dangerous area. Getting ourself in a wreck,
getting our horse in a wreck, and it’s better that everything is tight before you get ready to rope. When you warm your horse
up, you don’t wanna keep it too tight but then as
you’re getting ready to go, make sure that everything is snug and your saddle isn’t
gonna be going anywhere. That’s the number one key part to being safe when saddling
your horse for roping. So when we’re talking about
our bridle and our tie-down, there’s a few key things
that we wanna make sure we check every time. We wanna make sure that our headstall is good quality leather, good thickness, not too thin or poor quality. And when you put your bridle
in your horse’s mouth, you wanna make sure
that it’s snug in there, not too tight, but not too loose. I see that a lot at rodeos, people have their bit hanging too loose in their horse’s mouth and
they’re not getting any contact. They don’t have good enough brakes. We wanna make sure that the
tie-down strap right here, is not brittle or anything like that and it’s in good working condition so that way when we’re making a run for whatever event we might be doing, we don’t have the chance of it breaking during the middle of our run. If you’re tie-down strap breaks, you could wrap around your horse’s leg or you or anything like that. It has potential for a hazard
for your horse and yourself. We wanna make sure that when
we’re purchasing our tack, we wanna get a headstall that, I personally like something that is sewn or riveted and has sturdy leather. When we’re roping or doing any event we wanna have a good single rein, not split reins we’re not
out on the ranch or anything, we’re in the rodeo arena
and we wanna give ourself the best advantage with
a single pair of reins, it makes everything much
easier when competing in the timed events. (dramatic music) – We’re gonna be talking about
the team roping event now. That’s where one guy ropes
the head of the steer and the heeler comes in and
ropes him around the feet. A heeler uses a stiffer
rope, he wants it to be a tad bit newer so that
way it’s not burnt up and the coil will not
suck down around his hand and possibly lose a finger to it. – So I’m the header over here and I have an example of a
rope that’s more worn out and not exactly safe to use. It’s had a lot of runs on it, it’s got some smooth marks,
and it’s starting to fray a little bit right here
and this is a main area where you would dally a lot. So that’s why it’s pretty worn here and over time it has the possibility of actually breaking in
the middle of making a run. – Also down here the rawhide on the honda, if you look at this newer rope it’s nice and fresh it’s not worn out. Whether if you look at Wyatt’s rope here, it’s very worn out I mean
there’s another chance of that breaking too
and not feeding as well. – So the next part that
we’d like to talk about is always wearing a glove;
a good cotton roping glove is the way to go. You can get them at your feed store, same place you buy your ropes, and it’ll prevent you
from burning your hand and preventing injury to
your hands while roping. – When you dally you’re
gonna grab your rope, come across here, and you’re gonna put it all the way around the horn and pull back. It’s not safe when you
have a rope like Wyatt’s and he’s gonna show you what could happen when it comes down that
coil could suck down to it. – When you dally up,
you have the possibility of this rope being so worn
out it folds up easily, unlike McClane’s rope would,
and you have the possibility of your rope potentially coming and sucking around your fingers and that’s how you lose finger limbs. – One thing I’d like to
just be more specific about talking about dallying, we need to always remember that whether we’re heading or heeling, always make sure that our left hand is out of the way and your coils are out of
the way of your saddle horn. When we go to dally,
make sure that our thumb is always facing up and
that when we get a dally, we keep our hand a safe distance away to make sure that in case our rope slides or anything there’s not a chance of a coil coming around your fingers or getting your fingers
sucked into the saddle horn. – My safety tip is in the roping events, always carry a good sharp knife so if you ever get in a
wreck, you can always get out. So always carry one of these somewhere where you can get to it quickly. (dramatic music) – I’m gonna talk to you guys
about the steer wrestling event in rodeo it’s where two cowboys, two horses and one steer
go down in the arena and the hazer’s job is to keep
the steer running straight, and the bulldogger’s job
is to jump off his horse running 40 miles an hour,
grab the steer by his horns, and wrestle him to the
ground until all four feet are facing in the same direction. What I like to look for
when I first get to a rodeo in the bulldogging is to
see how the ground is. If the ground’s nice and fluffy and it looks like I could
get through it pretty easy, then I’m gonna know that
I could hit on top of it and I won’t have to worry
about my knees or my heels getting a big absorption
of the hard ground. If the ground’s hard then I know I wanna really hit on the
toes or the balls of my feet so that way my heels won’t
hurt, my knees won’t hurt. If it’s deep and heavy I wanna
make sure I stay on top of it same way toes down, so
that way no knee injury and no hip or body injury to me or the cattle is gonna happen. So what you’re gonna do
you’re gonna grab this steer by his horns, you’re
gonna place your feet here at 11 o’clock; you don’t
wanna hit at 12 o’clock or 1 o’clock cuz if you hit at 1 o’clock you have a chance to hula hand the steer which is where you guys flip end over end and that can result in a bad injury, a horn break or knee bust or something. So you’re gonna hit with
your legs about 11 o’clock. Tight head catch you’re
gonna bring him around, hook his nose, and lay him on his side. (dramatic music) – So we’re in the calf roping event now and there’s a lot of key things
that we need to make sure that we’re safe with when
making our calf roping. There’s a lot of moving parts and we need to make sure we’re
safe the whole entire time. So when we’re tying our
rope onto our saddle we wanna make sure that we always have a rope horn knot for tying our rope on. They have metal horn knots
and plastic horn knots, but the rope one is your best option because it is never gonna come loose. Metal ones or plastic ones can loosen when your rope is tied
onto your saddle horn, and your possibility of
slipping your finger in there and hurting yourself very badly. What we’re doing here is we put our rope through the keeper which is
connected to our tie down. This is gonna make sure
that our horse’s head stays facing us the whole time, and he doesn’t turn away
from us and cause a wreck. So we put our rope through the keeper then through the neck
rope, underneath our reins, and then to the saddle horn. When we tie our rope onto the saddle horn, we wanna make sure that we cinch it down as tight as we possibly can get it. That way when we’re making our run, there’s no chance of it coming loose and accidentally slipping
your finger in there when you’re getting off
and causing yourself to cut your fingers. Always double check
everything before you go. Make sure your horn knot is good, make sure your neck rope
and your keeper are working, and that your rope is in good condition to help you to do your best. So now that we’ve got our calf caught and we’re down the rope to him there’s a few things
that we need to make sure that we do to help ourselves be safe when flanking our calf
and then getting him tied. When we’re running to our calf, we wanna make sure that we run in there and we are in athletic
stance, athletic position. If we just run down there
standing straight up, we have a possibility of
the calf running us over, knocking us down, and getting us hurt. When we flank him, get in athletic stance, not standing straight up. If you’re standing straight up, then you have the possibility
of hurting your back or something like that. Use your legs to roll the calf over and get him on the ground. (dramatic music) – HI I’d like to talk to
you guys about the safety and the importance of safety
in a goat tying event. It’s important that you are mentally and physically ready for this event. By physically ready I mean being in shape at the best you can be,
and allowing yourself to stretch before the event. Second I’d like to talk
to you about your saddle being nice and tight so you won’t roll and you can step off nice and easy. It’s important to be aware
of your body position when you’re tying a goat. Body position should
look somewhat like this. Shoulders nice and square,
even with your goat straight, looking straight, so you’re
able to swing your leg over nice and easy, my shoulders are back, hips stay nice and square,
everything facing forward. So this way I’m able to step off and run straight to my
goat without any injuries. (dramatic music) – Hi my name is Amy Weich
and this is my horse Magnum. I choose to compete with
a helmet for its safety and I personally think it’s comfortable. And also I don’t get distracted by it because it doesn’t fall
off cuz it’s attached, and you can also ride in style. It’s not like your usual bike helmet, it’s specifically made for horse riding. You can find one online or
at your local tack store. Now I’m gonna talk about stretching. I like to stretch before
I go and run goats, so my legs are nice and
stretched out and flexible so when I go and run and
get off at a run for goats, I don’t hurt myself or pull anything. Some other people like
to stretch their arms out for roping so they can also be flexible whenever they’re roping
their calf or their steer and not pull anything. – Hey guys. Thanks for watching
our rodeo safety video. We hope that you learned a few things and remember it’s extremely important to take care of the livestock
that we’re competing on, to take care of the
equipment that we’re using before and after we compete,
to double check that, and also to take care of ourselves. We believe that if you
have those three things working together not only
will you be extremely safe, but you’ll also be very successful. One thing to keep in mind is
that while you’re representing state 4-H at these rodeos. When you have a
performance that doesn’t go the way that you would like it to, need to remember that there are young men and young women looking
at you as role models. And so it is very important
that we don’t pitch a fit or have a bad attitude
because these young men and young women are looking
at each and every one of you as what they would like
to be when they grow up. So it’s extremely important
to be professional, no matter your age. Thanks again for watching the New Mexico 4-H Rodeo Safety video, and good luck this year at your rodeos. (dramatic music)

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