Get the Correct Body Position – Horse Training

Get the Correct Body Position – Horse Training


This is a mare called promise and when
I first started schooling her she was literally a fire-breathing dragon.
She was so really nervous of everything, she was nervous of big spaces, she only
wanted to be with other horses. If you took her to the far edge of this field
now which I did, we can see she’s just about gone to sleep, she would have come
back in a muck sweat. Work at that aspect of your horses as much as any other part of
your schooling. And you will see with her that you don’t need the running reins,
that she is a little bit more advanced, she can actually do the lead changes now.
But it’s taken a while to get there. And again, just the whole purpose of these
videos this week is just to show you again how she’s in the same ported gag
that captivate, the racehorse was in, and it really has suited her so I’ve
been very lucky to find that, and she’s very comfortable in it. But again, if
you’re looking at this mare, compared to the last gray mare has got a
head very low so when you asking her to do anything you actually have to pick
her up and get her alive. But you can see she’s turning completely with my legs, I’m
doing nothing with my hands at all. If I push with my left leg now here’s this horse turning
and I’ve literally got a touch of the neck rein, and she would make that turn.
Here’s my right leg turning and what you get from the camera and from the TV, you
would ever see what I’m doing with my hands, because she’s coming off my legs
so nicely. But I always warn the horses as well when I’m schooling with just
that little voice, that whoa. So that they associate that with the stopping and
once I start to use it, then they find the stops easier. So, I’m looking for ways
all the time to make it as easy as it can be for them
to learn what I want. She will do the side passing there, you can see, she
will turn (come), will turn the circle with her head out. And again the use of
my voice instead of a whip. There she’s coming that way, if I change legs she
will turn this way, if I touch my left rein and my left leg she will put a head
out the circle and turn to the right. If I change legs with no movement of the
reins she will turn back again. So again, you can see how hard I’ve worked with
every horse to get it sensitive to the legs, and knowing what I want from my
legs so that my hands can be so much lighter. (Get that head up a little bit) You
can see she’s inclined to want to duck her head, so… but what I’m working on with her to
get the stops is to get the backside underneath her a little bit, so I’m going
to start with just pick her head up a little bit when I make the stops, before I
check her. So strong legs, drive her into the bridle, (whoa) there and pick my hands
up, get a little softer with them, but get that backend underneath that bit, so that she starts
to get her back legs tucked under her instead of diving onto her front legs all
the time. Strong into my heels here as well, it really helps with those stops. Now I’m
much stronger, she is alive, pick my hand up (whoa, come, come, head up, head up, come, that’s what I want, come). My legs are really strong now, I’m
picking her up (Whoa, whoa) and just a little firmer pull before I start to stop her,
just to pick her head up, so that she gets out of the habit of diving into the
ground as I touch, because she stops to a really light touch. But the problem is
that as I’m stopping with that light touch she’s already down in front and
stopping with her nose dropping to the ground. Now I’ve got a lot stronger with
that pull, just to say I won’t put up with you diving into the ground. So, it’s
not a jerk, but I’ve got a lot stronger and sometimes you have to do that just
to remind the horse what you’re looking for. And there you can see after that
pull, straight away the horse realizes that there are boundaries… that I will
coax her to a point, but after that I’m going to say “do it” in a quiet, humane way,
but she has to do it, so she will pick her head up. Strong legs (whoa),
and there you can see now no more nose to the ground. So, it’s taken a little bit
of time and coaxing and I’ve worked through that lesson to where she is
ready now to stop with your head up. Strong legs, pick her up first, and there you
can start to see the stops building with her backside coming under her, because
I’m holding her actually out of that. I’m not releasing the tension quite as much
to start with, and she knows that if she goes down I’m going to react and pull
back. So, now I don’t have to react, I can just keep the tension and she’s starting
to understand those stops. (whoa, hey, don’t dive that nose at me). There, one pull back
and there you’ve got a horse stopping in the correct shape again. So, you have to just work with what
you have. She very much – her way of dealing with pressure is to dive her head
down and start to get strong with a bit there. Many horses will pick their head
up and fight you high, her way of avoiding stress is to go down. So, just
work with the horse, understand what your problems are and just be aware of what’s
coming… (Good girl, well done!) You can see her really ready to stop now,
and I want all my young horses that way that they are ready to stop not into the
bridle. So, once I get that feeling from her, get the stops correct ,she’s rolling
back nicely, don’t go on fixing what ain’t broke. She’s done, finished, get her
out of here…

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