Officers on horseback who led handcuffed black man through streets won’t be charged

Officers on horseback who led handcuffed black man through streets won’t be charged


 Police officers who were pictured on horseback leading a handcuffed black man through the streets while he was attached to a rope won’t face any criminal charges, it’s emerged  Patrick Brosch and Amanda Smith arrested Donald Neely, 43, and caused a public outcry by leading him away with a blue rope earlier this month  But a third-party investigation of the arrest has since been completed and found “nothing that warranted a criminal investigation”  Lieutenant Craig Cummings, of Texas Rangers, wrote in a statement: “At the request of the Galveston Police Department, the Texas Rangers conducted an inquiry into this matter, which has since been completed ”  A separate investigation by the Galveston County Sheriff’s Office is ongoing.    Dad-to-eight Neely was charged with misdemeanor criminal trespass  His sister, Taranette Neely, “doesn’t have a reaction to the Rangers’ decision,” according to Mail Online  The pictures, taken on August 3 in Galveston, Texas, show the two officers, wearing riding hats,  seen either side of the arrested man  In a statement at the time, the police force said a “transportation unit was not immediately available at the time of arrest”  The officers who arrested him were involved in a separate arrest of another man earlier, police said, and a transport vehicle wasn’t available after one took the first man in for booking  They went on to explain how Neely “was handcuffed and a line was clipped to the handcuffs”  Despite admitting the method of arrest is used in volatile situations, such as crowd control, the force added: “The practice was not used correctly in this instance”  But Neely’s sister-in-law Christin Neely said in a Facebook post her brother is a “homeless and mentally ill” man  Police explained that a  transportation unit was not immediately available at the time the mounted officers were called pick up Neely  “While this technique of using mounted horses to transport a person during an arrest is considered a best practice in certain scenarios, such as during crowd control, the practice was not the correct use for this instance,” wrote the department on its Facebook page

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *