Our usual dressage training | Vlog #04

Our usual dressage training | Vlog #04


Just like with the walk, I do a bit of leg yielding, to get some nice bend in the trot Hi everyone, nice to see you again in this vlog I’m planning to ride in a moment, and I’d like to show you how I go about doing this. As you can see behind me, I’m currently mucking Just A Dream his stable. And he’s in the walker right now. I’m going to get him, and then tack up. I’ve switched my jodhpur boots for my new Sophia riding boots, and I’ve put Just A Dream in the wash area. So I can go grooming and tack up after. Next to riding, I also lunge as part of my training schedule for him. I do this 2 or 3 times a week. This vlog is online already, so if your curious about this, you can click the i in the top of the screen. I always use a little trick when putting on the fetlock boots, I fasten it just above the pastern, and then slowly press it down. This makes sure it is tight around the pastern, and the hairs below are also smooth. I always use a half pad on him when riding, because it makes sure the saddle stays in place. Because Just A Dream is still growing a lot in height and muscle, the fit of the saddle is not perfect yet so that’s why I’m using a foam pad. I always position the saddle quite a bit to the front, because I always slides back quite a lot with him. So it looks like it’s positioned to much to the front, but that’s not really the case. I’m going to lunge him a little before riding, So I’m tying up the reins now. I do this by twisting the reins around and tying them to this strap. We’re all set to ride and I’m going to the indoor arena now. As I said I always start with a a bit of lunging. And the lunging is also good to get his muscels warmed up a little. I’m also untying the reins, that’s easier with riding! My camerawoman is holding him to be sure, ’cause he’s still young and it’s better to have someone hold him while mounting. Got it, thanks I always start with a warming up, of course. I always make sure I keep him on a good length and that he’s walking forwards Because that’s important for young horses, that they’re long and low With long and low I make sure I have the reins quite long and through thet enable him to lower this neck, and stretch his nose to the front. So he doesn’t get behind the bit. And he has to stretch his topline from neck to taill I’ve just walked on the left lead, and now on the right. And I do basically the same things. Now I’ll loosly do some leg yields. I’ll switch it up with riding circles and a little bending from one side to the other. To get him nice and supple in his body. I’m doing some leg yields here, I don’t do this the way you should during a dressage test, by turning at A, and yield up to the track. I’m just turning anywhere on the short side and with the bend he has from the turn, I’ll make him yield. I think he’s warmed up now, so I’ll transition to the trot. And slowly build the trot. As you can see he got against the bit there, which means he pushed his nose to the front. So I’ll do the transition again. You’ll see he’ll make an irregular step from time to time, or almost transition to canter. This is because he finds stretching during trot quite difficult still. It’s not like he’s lame or irregular. He just finds stretching his feet far in front of him a little difficult. I’m really glad we have a mirror in the indoor arena. I can check my own posture of course, but also see how Just A Dream is going. To see how he’s holding his neck. Et cetera. He’s nice and loose in the trot now, So I’ll bring him onto the circle, or just like in the walk, do some leg yields. To also in the trot, make him bend his body. I’ve been trotting for about 15 minutes, so I’ll let him slow to a trot. To let him catch his breath. He’s young after all. I’ll give him a long rein, but make sure he keeps up an active walk. I’ve shortened the reins now, a little bit shorter than just yet, because I want to canter after this. And then I like to have just a little bit more control. Good boy. I like to transition on a circle, this gives him a little bit more balance. Than when, for example, transitioning on the short side. I’m going along the track now, I make sure he’s maintaining an active canter. He’s also inclined to get behind the bit when cantering. Which means he bends his chin to his chest. I try to prevent this by offering him enough length in the rein and carry my hands a little bit higher. On the long side I sometimes make him accelerate a little. Good. And slow him down a little on the short side. I’m happy with how he’s going on this lead, so I’m going to trot change direction and repeat this on the left lead. I’ll go on a circle again. To make sure he’s bending to the left. Which means his whole body is arched to the left. This prevents he might transition into the wrong lead. I’ve made him trot again. I’m slowly letting him lengthen his neck. This way I’m practicing forward downward stretching at the same time. Then I’m transitioning to the walk, and let him cool down. I’m giving him enough rein to let him walk freely. He’s done a good job. I’ll give him a good pet. As you might have seen I work a lot on controlling tempo and how he carries his neck. This is pretty much how I train him every time, and of course I switch it up with lunging. But this is a good image of our average under saddle training. I want to thank you for watching. I hope you liked it! And I’ll see you again next time. Bye!

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