Regan’s Story

Regan’s Story


From her earliest childhood memories, Regan
has always felt most at home here; most comfortable with them. I have been on horses as long as
I can remember. Oh I love everything about them, their especially their smell. I don’t
know if you’ve ever got a nose hit right of a horse, it’s the best thing in the world.
I mean I just love them, they’re awesome animals. I grew up spending all my summers on a farm
and we would throw the horses in the trailer and bring them up to our cottage and go trail
riding and it was a wonderful experience growing up. But for all horses have done to shape
Regan’s life, one ride, one fateful day changed her life forever. I was riding my grandpa’s
horse Murphy, and Murphy he was part draft horse. So I was riding him and I was in the
arena, doing everything right, being safe, had my helmet on and Murphy ended up tripping
and falling. And because I mean horses are big in general and he was extra big, he took
me down with him and the momentum of him falling caused me to hit my head with a lot of force.
Regan’s accident resulted in traumatic brain injury. Her local hospital stabilized her
then transferred her to The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center where she was placed
under the care of Dr. Jerry Mysiw. She was still in a period referred to as post traumatic
amnesia. She was having a lot of difficulty in retaining new information from one day
to the next. My left side was more or less paralyzed. My arm was like this and I couldn’t
basically couldn’t move it. I definitely couldn’t walk. Regan’s scans revealed many different
points of injury across large portions of her brain. Thousands of connections that took
a lifetime to create instantly disconnected. There is no medicine that can help in these
situations, but a team of experts at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center had a plan.
To us, exercise is our medicine. And we use exercise, therapeutic activities in order
to help the brain heal. The drive that that brain plasticity to reorganize itself in a
way that is productive and meaningful. It takes a multidisciplinary team of doctors,
nurses, psychologists, therapists and others to help patients recreate those lost neural
pathways, and the process is not easy. Right when I got to Dodd, they did this test and
I couldn’t even stand up. Definitely a lot of hard work. I mean it just took so much
effort and if I would get tired I just completely shut down. Through hard work and determination
and the patience and skill of her care team, Regan slowly regained her motion and brain
function. And all along, remembered the advice that she’d heard so often whenever she faced
adversity on the farm. Get back on the horse. Well, I did that. Regan has come a long way.
Just a few years ago she was learning to walk all over again. Today, she’s teaching spinning
classes. While most marvel at Regan’s resilience, she’s quick to credit her team at Ohio State’s
Wexner Medical Center, especially her therapist who patiently worked to bring out her best.
A relationship she appreciates like few others. A great therapist is the equivalent of of
of a great coach. The therapist has to understand what that individual’s limitations are. They
have to know how to push them harder than that individual thought that they could work
and all while encouraging them to see all at each step that they’re making progress.
That they’re they’re moving towards a desired goal. Most of the therapists who stay in this
field are rather extraordinary people. Their commitment, their kindness, their empathy
and their toughness to keep driving people to get better is special. I’m so thankful.
I I mean I I wouldn’t be where I am right now without them. I mean I, if I was anywhere
else I I mean I couldn’t tell you how my recovery would have progressed, but I know that I can’t
imagine having been any better. So I, I mean I owe a lot to them.

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